Sunday, October 20, 2013

A Little Late to the Party: Coffeeneuring Challenge Ride #1


I know, I know, it's been WEEKS since this challenge began. It's been a bit busy recently, so today marked my first stab at the Third Annual Coffeeneuring Challenge. Unlike past years, this time around I think I'll follow a theme or a plan of some sort. Yes, this year I'll ride to seven separate towns that represent my some of my the amazing richness of life in the Hudson Valley.


I begin my odyssey with a ride to one of the earliest European settlements in the area. Originally named Esopus, Kingston, NY was settled, along with Albany and New Amsterdam, by the Dutch in 1651. It persisted as a Dutch settlement for many years, but like most of the area, was taken over by English-speaking colonists during the 17th and 18th centuries. In 1777, Kingston became the capitol of New York State for a short time until the city was torched by British soldiers during the American Revolution. The historic Senate House and several of the other 17th century stone homes are open for tours.



Today, Kingston is divided into three sections, the most interesting of which is the Uptown or Stockade district. Filled with historic stone homes, the area is also home to a growing community of artists and creative souls. The Outdated Cafe is one of my favorites. Where else can you sit and enjoy a giant, freshly baked pear scone with piping hot Costa Rica gold alongside antique dress frames and manual typewriters? I almost felt like a hipster!

Location: Kingston, NY
Venue: Outdated Cafe
Coffee: French Roast Costa Rican
Carbs: Pear Scone
Mileage: 32

2 comments:

  1. Kingston historical fun fact: Kingston has the only street corner in the US on which the buildings on all four corners predate the American Revolution. Corner of Crown and John Streets: http://goo.gl/maps/E61UB

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  2. This is fascinating! I am going back to see this corner. By the way, I live in a pre-revolutionary house myself. Odd to consider the conversations that took place here over 230 years ago.

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